Monday, December 31, 2018

30 Books I Read in 2018: 26-30

Books 1-5 | Books 6-10 | Books 11-15 | Books 16-20 | Books 21-25

26. One Child by Torey Hayden



Genre: Nonfiction

Disability Representation: Yes (multiple, but primarily selective mutism and trauma)

Rating: 2 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummarySheila was wild, unreachable, abused--and a genius. She was a child lost until a brilliant young teacher reached out.

What I Thought: I still remember finding this book in a Barnes and Noble, completely by chance, back in 2004.  I turned to Chapter 6, to check out how it was written, and I was hooked.

Since then, I've reread One Child countless times.  And counted it as a favorite book.  This time is the first read-through that things about the book bothered me:

Because it was published in the early '80s, the R-word was still commonly used.  Also some instances came across for the first time as racist.  Not to mention just how ill-equipped the author was at the age of 24 to handle a child with as much trauma as Sheila had.

In spite of all this, Sheila herself remains engaging as ever, and I love discovering things with her like flowers and lotion for the first time ever.  But I had to seriously adjust my wheel-rating, which, at one point would have been 4 Wheels.  

I can't give it that on good conscience anymore, but I still found myself liking the book.


27. The Thing About Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin




Genre: YA

Disability Representation: Yes (selective mutism and main character could be read as autistic)

Rating: 3 Wheels

Age Range: 12+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryAfter her best friend dies in a drowning accident, Suzy is convinced that the true cause of the tragedy must have been a rare jellyfish sting--things don't just happen for no reason. Retreating into a silent world of imagination, she crafts a plan to prove her theory--even if it means traveling the globe, alone. Suzy's achingly heartfelt journey explores life, death, the astonishing wonder of the universe...and the potential for love and hope right next door.

What I Thought: While the book as a whole wasn't one I might typically pick up and read, the storyline was engaging.  I thought it was a unique take on childhood grief, and I really liked the ending.


28.  Dread Nation by Justina Ireland




Genre: Historical Fiction

Disability Representation: No

Rating: 2 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads Summary:  Jane McKeene was born two days before the dead began to walk the battlefields of Gettysburg and Chancellorsville—derailing the War Between the States and changing America forever. In this new nation, safety for all depends on the work of a few, and laws like the Native and Negro Reeducation Act require certain children attend combat schools to learn to put down the dead. But there are also opportunities—and Jane is studying to become an Attendant, trained in both weaponry and etiquette to protect the well-to-do. It’s a chance for a better life for Negro girls like Jane. After all, not even being the daughter of a wealthy white Southern woman could save her from society’s expectations.

What I Thought: Not the easiest book to get through but I did find myself fully immersed in the world the author created and wondering what would happen to Jane next.  I liked it enough that I'd check out the next book in the series.  (It looks like there will be a series?)


29.  Hello, Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly




Genre: YA

Disability Representation: Yes (D/deaf, and unspecified learning disability)

Rating: 0 Wheels

Age Range: 12+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryIn one day, four lives weave together in unexpected ways. Virgil Salinas is shy and kindhearted and feels out of place in his loud and boisterous family. Valencia Somerset, who is deaf, is smart, brave, and secretly lonely, and loves everything about nature. Kaori Tanaka is a self-proclaimed psychic, whose little sister Gen is always following her around. And Chet Bullens wishes the weird kids would just act normal so that he can concentrate on basketball. They aren’t friends -- at least not until Chet pulls a prank that traps Virgil and his pet guinea pig at the bottom of a well. This disaster leads Kaori, Gen, and Valencia on an epic quest to find the missing Virgil. Through luck, smarts, bravery, and a little help from the universe, a rescue is performed, a bully is put in his place, and friendship blooms.

What I Thought: So many issues with this one: There's repeated (unaddressed) use of the R-word by a bully, the bully's (severely ableist, audist) perspective for several chapters.  Valencia, who is D/deaf must rely on hearing aides and lip reading as the child of hearing parents, who was never taught sign language.

Virgil (who has unspecified learning disabilities) is repeatedly verbally assaulted and terrorized by the bully.  He ends up in a life-threatening situation only to be rescued by other children.  It is on him to stand up to the child who abuses him, and his family barely notices anything was amiss after Virgil disappeared for most of a day.  Highly recommend skipping this one, especially if you're hoping for good disability representation.


30. The Running Dream by Wendelin Van Draanen




Genre: YA

Disability Representation: Yes (amputation and Cerebral Palsy)

Rating: 0 Wheels

Age Range: 12+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryJessica thinks her life is over when she loses a leg in a car accident. She's not comforted by the news that she'll be able to walk with the help of a prosthetic leg. Who cares about walking when you live to run?

What I Thought: If I was rating the first two parts of this book?  I'd have given it 3 to 4 Wheels easily.  I felt the representation was refreshingly authentic.

But parts 3 through 5 seriously dropped the ball.  What had the potential to be a rare strong piece of representation by a nondisabled author who did her research devolved (in my opinion) into nothing more than inspiration porn.

Jessica and Rosa (who has CP) never formed an authentic friendship.  Instead their interactions were academic and glossed over.  Their connection to each other felt more like a transaction (Rosa helping Jessica pass algebra II and Jessica helping Rosa achieve what she wanted, but never really showed Jessica getting to know Rosa as a person.)

What was worse is that Jessica was constantly and consistently exploited by peers and the news media as an object of inspiration and when the public started to recognize her (as inspiration porn) she thanked them and used it to push her.  (Which, again, in my opinion, is a totally nondisabled take on a common issue in disability culture, and damaging to boot.)

Sunday, December 30, 2018

30 Books I Read in 2018: 21-25

Books 1-5 | Books 6-10 | Books 11-15 | Books 16-20 

21. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling


Genre: Fantasy

Disability Representation: Yes (trauma)

Rating: 3 Wheels

Age Range: 12+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryThe Dursleys were so mean and hideous that summer that all Harry Potter wanted was to get back to the Hogwarts School for Witchcraft and Wizardry. But just as he's packing his bags, Harry receives a warning from a strange, impish creature named Dobby who says that if Harry Potter returns to Hogwarts, disaster will strike.

What I Thought:  Honestly?  This one was really difficult for me to get into.  But the last third of the book was amazing!  I loved it so much because I didn't see it coming.  Such clever story-telling.  If the whole book had been at that level, this would have gotten 4 Wheels for sure!


22.  Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling



Genre: Fantasy

Disability Representation: Yes (trauma)

Rating: 2 Wheels

Age Range: 12+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryHarry Potter's third year at Hogwarts is full of new dangers. A convicted murderer, Sirius Black, has broken out of Azkaban prison, and it seems he's after Harry.

What I Thought: This one had its strong points but overall I found it harder to follow than the first two.  I still liked it, hence the 2 Wheel rating, but I couldn't get into it as much as the previous books.  I did like the new Dark Arts professor and the little twist at the very end.


23.  Adult Children of Emotionally Immature Parents by Lindsay C. Gibson



Genre: Psychology

Disability Representation: No

Rating: 4 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads Summary:  In this breakthrough book, clinical psychologist Lindsay Gibson exposes the destructive nature of parents who are emotionally immature or unavailable. You will see how these parents create a sense of neglect, and discover ways to heal from the pain and confusion caused by your childhood. By freeing yourself from your parents’ emotional immaturity, you can recover your true nature, control how you react to them, and avoid disappointment. Finally, you’ll learn how to create positive, new relationships so you can build a better life.

What I Thought: Really good.  Dare I say, life-changing?  One I'll definitely read again.  


24.  Out of My Mind by Sharon M. Draper



Genre: YA

Disability Representation: Yes (Cerebral Palsy)

Rating: 0 Wheels

Age Range: 12+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryMelody is not like most people. She cannot walk or talk, but she has a photographic memory; she can remember every detail of everything she has ever experienced. She is smarter than most of the adults who try to diagnose her and smarter than her classmates in her integrated classroom - the very same classmates who dismiss her as mentally challenged because she cannot tell them otherwise. But Melody refuses to be defined by cerebral palsy. And she's determined to let everyone know it - somehow.

What I Thought: This is one I picked up because I'd heard time and time again about kids as young as fifth grade reading it in school.  There is not adequate time or space to detail how harmful the representation in this book is.  Do yourself a favor and skip it.  (For more details, check out my Twitter thread on the subject.)


25.  The Pact by Jodi Picoult



Genre: Fiction

Disability Representation: Yes (trauma)

Rating: 0 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads Summary:  For eighteen years the Hartes and the Golds have lived next door to each other, sharing everything from Chinese food to chicken pox to carpool duty-- they've grown so close it seems they have always been a part of each other's lives. Parents and children alike have been best friends, so it's no surprise that in high school Chris and Emily's friendship blossoms into something more. They've been soul mates since they were born.

What I Thought: This was a reread that I will honestly never reread again.  I've read it twice previously, several years ago, but never quite came away with such an awful feeling in the pit of my stomach.

Saturday, December 29, 2018

30 Books I Read in 2018: 16-20

Books 1-5 | Books 6-10 | Books 11-15

16. My Story by Elizabeth Smart



Genre: Autobiography / Memoir

Disability Representation: Yes (trauma)

Rating: 4 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryFor the first time, ten years after her abduction from her Salt Lake City bedroom, Elizabeth Smart reveals how she survived and the secret to forging a new life in the wake of a brutal crime.

What I Thought: This was a reread for me, and a strong one.  I get more out of this book each time I read it.  Elizabeth is such a strong voice in the survivor community and I appreciate her willingness to speak out.  


17. Allegedly by Tiffany D. Jackson



Genre: YA

Disability Representation: Yes (mental health)

Rating: 1 Wheel

Age Range: 14+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryMary B. Addison killed a baby.

Allegedly. She didn’t say much in that first interview with detectives, and the media filled in the only blanks that mattered: A white baby had died while under the care of a churchgoing black woman and her nine-year-old daughter. The public convicted Mary and the jury made it official. But did she do it? She wouldn’t say.

What I Thought: I liked this book so much until the end, which kind of soured it for me.  Would not reread, but I am glad I read it once.


18. TRUST by Iyanla Vanzant



Genre: Self Help

Disability Representation: No?

Rating: 1 Wheel

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads Summary“You just can’t trust anyone!” seems to be a constant refrain in the modern world. Indeed, learning to trust is one of life’s most difficult lessons. “That’s because trust is not a verb,” says legendary life coach Iyanla Vanzant, “it’s a noun. Trust is a state of mind and a state of being.”

What I Thought: I was a big fan of Iyanla Vanzant on the show Starting Over, back in the early 2000s.  But this all just seemed too much to grasp too quickly for me.  I felt like this was Trust 5.0 and I was missing a bunch of levels before I got here.  The one takeaway I got?  "The chef's job is to be the chef.  You are not the chef.  You are the carrot.  Your job is to be a carrot."


19. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling


Genre: Fantasy

Disability Representation: Yes (trauma)

Rating: 3 Wheels

Age Range: 12+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryHarry Potter's life is miserable. His parents are dead and he's stuck with his heartless relatives, who force him to live in a tiny closet under the stairs. But his fortune changes when he receives a letter that tells him the truth about himself: he's a wizard. A mysterious visitor rescues him from his relatives and takes him to his new home, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

What I Thought: I first read this book a couple of years ago, and thought it was time to give it another chance.  Strangely, I found myself enjoying it more this time around.  Though I had to keep notes to keep track of some of the more fantastical elements, the overall story was engaging, and I really enjoyed it this time.


20. VOX by Christina Dalcher



Genre: Science Fiction / Dystopia

Disability Representation: Yes (trauma)

Rating: 3 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummarySet in an America where half the population has been silenced, VOX is the harrowing, unforgettable story of what one woman will do to protect herself and her daughter...

What I Thought:  The premise is what got me reading this one!  So intriguing and strangely believable.  While I wasn't super invested in every aspect of this (romance), the story itself was strong enough to keep my interest and I found myself wanting to know what would happen next.  A real page-turner.

Friday, December 28, 2018

30 Books I Read in 2018: 11-15

Books 1-5 | Books 6-10

11.  Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi



Genre: Fantasy

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating: 4 Wheels

Age Range: 14+

Excerpt of Goodreads Summary:
They killed my mother.
They took our magic.
They tried to bury us.


Now we rise.

What I Thought: Amazing, powerful story.  I'm so excited that this is the first in a series!  I'll definitely be checking out the rest.

Disability representation - the main character's father is disabled, I believe.


12.  The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead



Genre: Historical Fiction

Disability Representation: Not sure

Rating: 1 Wheel

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryCora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hellish for all the slaves but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood - where even greater pain awaits. 

What I Thought: Really difficult for me to follow.  Probably would not reread this one again.  Took a long time to get going on, and a longer time to finish.


13. Roots by Alex Haley




Genre: Historical Fiction

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating: 4 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryWhen he was a boy in Henning, Tennessee, Alex Haley's grandmother used to tell him stories about their family—stories that went back to her grandparents, and their grandparents, down through the generations all the way to a man she called "the African." She said he had lived across the ocean near what he called the "Kamby Bolongo" and had been out in the forest one day chopping wood to make a drum when he was set upon by four men, beaten, chained and dragged aboard a slave ship bound for Colonial America.

What I Thought: I was 10 years old when I first saw the Roots miniseries from the 70's as it reaired for several nights in the early 90's.  I watched scenes in history class in high school.  But it was not until the incredible 2016 miniseries that Tara and I decided we had to read the book.

It took us nearly 2 years (with a long break) but we did finish it.  The book depicts so much, drives home so much.  It forced me to confront my white guilt and to sit with it for 900 pages.  

I was intrigued by this early disability representation as Kunta Kinte (and countless other enslaved people) were maimed for attempting to escape.  I noticed the author's use of the word "crutching," as a verb, because I'd never seen it before.  (But am reading a more current book now, ironically, that uses the same term.

I'm going to quote Tara here when I say, "Do yourself a favor and pick this book up, and then read every page."


14. Second Glance by Jodi Picoult




Genre: Fiction

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating: 3 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads Summary: When odd, supernatural events plague the town of Comtosook, a ghost hunter is hired by the developer to help convince the residents that there's nothing spiritual about the property. An intricate tale of love, haunting memories, and renewal. 

What I Thought: This has long been my favorite Jodi Picoult novel and one I've returned to over and over through the years.  This is the first year I reread it and actually liked it less.

A big part of that is realizing how the children in the book (one with XP, a genetic condition that makes his skin unable to repair itself after being exposed to UV light) are neglected.

I still really enjoyed the book, but I couldn't give it my customary 4 Wheels, this time.


15. Any Man by Amber Tamblyn



Genre: Fiction

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating: 4 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryA violent serial rapist is on the loose, who goes by the name Maude. She hunts for men at bars, online, at home— the place doesn’t matter, neither does the man. Her victims then must live the aftermath of their assault in the form of doubt from the police, feelings of shame alienation from their friends and family and the haunting of a horrible woman who becomes the phantom on which society projects its greatest fears, fascinations and even misogyny. All the while the police are without leads and the media hound the victims, publicly dissecting the details of their attack.

What I Thought: This was amazing.

We read the audiobook for this one (having been fans of Amber Tamblyn, Russ Tamblyn and Jason Ritter when all three starred on the early 2000's drama, Joan of Arcadia together.) Knowing that they all lent their talents to the audiobook, Tara and I could not pass up the opportunity to listen to them read this.

A stunning, strong, creative debut novel, it deals with the aftermath of sexual assault - including trauma, anxiety, depression, eating disorders etc.  Any Man will make you take a second look at the world we live in, and accomplishes the difficult task of telling a common story in an uncommon way, while still engrossing the reader.  Highly recommend.  Definitely a favorite new read this year.

Thursday, December 27, 2018

30 Books I Read in 2018: 6-10

Books 1-5

6. The Kindness of Strangers by Katrina Kittle



Genre: Fiction

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating: 4 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads SummaryA young widow raising two boys, Sarah Laden is struggling to keep her family together. But when a shocking revelation rips apart the family of her closest friend, Sarah finds herself welcoming yet another troubled young boy into her already tumultuous life...

What I Thought: Full disclosure: This is a book I reread once a year, and I have, since I first discovered it back around 2007.  And honestly?  I get more and more out of it every single time I read it.  Very heavy subject matter.  The disability representation here focuses on the effects of longterm child abuse and neglect.  Things like trauma and dissociation.



7. Room by Emma Donaghue


Genre: Fiction

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating: 4 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt from Goodreads SummaryTo five-year-old Jack, Room is the entire world. It is where he was born and grew up; it's where he lives with his Ma as they learn and read and eat and sleep and play. At night, his Ma shuts him safely in the wardrobe, where he is meant to be asleep when Old Nick visits... 

What I Thought: This is another book that I find myself returning to annually.  Jack's perspective is so rich and real.  And though the book stays with him throughout, we do get a sense that he has a very unique take on what's happening to him and his ma.  Because, to him, it's normal.  He does not know another life.

This is another book where the disability representation is more focused on invisible disabilities: trauma, depression, anxiety, etc.


8. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander



Genre: Nonfiction

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating: 3 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt from Goodreads SummaryAs the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status--much like their grandparents before them.

What I Thought: Educational and a necessary read, particularly for white people, like myself.  I won't lie.  This book took us 2.5 years to finish.  It's dense and textbook-like.  But Tara and I knew it was important.  We knew we had to educate ourselves.

Disability representation here is focused again on mental health: depression, schizophrenia, etc.


9.  What Happened by Hilary Rodham Clinton




Genre: Nonfiction

Disability Representation: No

Rating: 1 Wheel

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt from Goodreads Summary“In the past, for reasons I try to explain, I’ve often felt I had to be careful in public, like I was up on a wire without a net. Now I’m letting my guard down.” —Hillary Rodham Clinton, from the introduction of What Happened

What I Thought: Not my favorite read.  Not a book I'd read again.  While I'm glad I read it for historical reasons, the only details I recall enjoying months after the fact?  When Hilary detailed the food she ate.  (Seriously.  If the whole book had been that?  I'd have been hooked.)


10.  Mind Platter by Najwa Zebian



Genre: Poetry

Disability Representation: No

Rating: 1 Wheel

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt from Goodreads Summary
To the heart in you, don’t be afraid to feel. 
To the sun in you, don’t be afraid to shine. 
To the love in you, don’t be afraid to heal. 
To the ocean in you, don’t be afraid to rage. 

To the silence in you, don’t be afraid to break. 


What I Thought: I found this author by happening upon a post of hers about surviving trauma.  Her thoughts were compelling enough that I went searching for her book.  While I found it helpful and enjoyable at first, eventually it was hard to stay open when reading this book.

Wednesday, December 26, 2018

30 Books I Read in 2018: 1-5

(Borrowing this idea from my friend Ellen, who blogged about The 20 Books I Read in 2017 last year.)

This year, I had a goal to read 24 books - 2 per month.  I ended up reading 30 (not including my own work.)  My success at reading was largely due to discovering Goodreads which allows me to keep track of the books I am reading.

I love realistic fiction, but made a concerted effort to branch out this year, and read more by authors of color.  I'm also a big fan of going back to books I already know I love, so several of these were rereads as well.

My rating system was inspired by Malice of Malice's Movie Madness.

0 Wheels = Did Not Like It
1 Wheel = It Was Okay
2 Wheels = Liked It
3 Wheels = Really Liked It
4 Wheels = It Was Amazing


1.  An Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solomon


Genre: Science Fiction

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating: 4 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads Summary:  Odd-mannered, obsessive, withdrawn, Aster has little to offer folks in the way of rebuttal when they call her ogre and freak. She's used to the names; she only wishes there was more truth to them. If she were truly a monster, as they accuse, she'd be powerful enough to tear down the walls around her until nothing remained of her world, save for stories told around the cookfire...

What I Thought:  Definitely some of the best disability representation I have ever read.  I cannot recommend this book highly enough.  Check out my previous post about this book for further thoughts.


2. Every Day by David Levithan


Genre: YA

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating: 2 Wheels

Age Range: 12+

Excerpt from Goodreads Summary:  Every day a different body. Every day a different life. Every day in love with the same girl.

There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.

What I Thought:  Only one of the bodies A inhabits has any type of disability and the detailing of that particular day is sparse.  So, this isn't a book I'd necessarily go to if you're looking for good disability representation, but it was an interesting book that I did like.


3. Courage to Soar by Simone Biles


Genre: Autobiography / Memoir

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating:  2 Wheels

Age Range: 9+

Excerpt from Goodreads Summary:  Simone Biles’ entrance into the world of gymnastics may have started on a daycare field trip in her hometown of Spring, Texas, but her God-given talent, passion, and perseverance have made her one of the top gymnasts in the world, as well as a four-time winner of Olympic gold in Rio de Janeiro.

But there is more to Simone than the nineteen medals—fourteen of them gold—and the Olympic successes. Through years of hard work and determination, she has relied on her faith and family to stay focused and positive, while having fun competing at the highest level and doing what she loves. Here, in her own words, Simone takes you through the events, challenges, and trials that carried her from an early childhood in foster care to a coveted spot on the 2016 Olympic team.

What I Thought: As a longtime fan of women's gymnastics, I really enjoyed Simone's memoir.  From her childhood in foster care to finding a stable, loving home with her parents, to achieving her dreams.  

Disability representation is included through Simone's middle school years as she talks about being diagnosed with A.D.H.D.


4. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Genre: YA

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating: 4 Wheels

Age Range: 14+

Excerpt from Goodreads Summary: Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

What I Thought: Powerful.  I read this back in February of this year and ten months later, the storyline is still with me.  Vividly authentic, this book centers on one family and the impact of police brutality on their world.  Disability representation I recall is PTSD - which, again - is thoughtfully depicted.  One of the most important reads of this year for me.


5.  Born a Crime by Trevor Noah


Genre: Autobiography / Memoir

Disability Representation: Yes

Rating: 3 Wheels

Age Range: 18+

Excerpt of Goodreads Summary: The compelling, inspiring, and comically sublime New York Times bestseller about one man’s coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed.

Trevor Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison..

What I Thought:  This book was slow to start for me, which is the main reason I gave it 3 wheels instead of 4.  I really enjoyed the author's narrative voice, but the end was the part I related to the most strongly.

Disability representation in this one is not at the forefront but does include his grandmother, who is blind, and was present in the author's early years.

Monday, November 12, 2018

CP Tag

Hey, guys!  It's been a while.  It's National Novel Writing Month, which means I am writing something besides a blog.  (Weird.)  At the end of October I did a Twitter review of Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper.  You can check that out here if you missed it.

Otherwise, I just saw a post by my friend Zahraa, at The Disabled Muslim where she recently shared Two Tags and An Explanation for Where I've Been.  

I really liked the CP Tag, and decided to do it here: