Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Great Disability Blog Posts of 2016 (Part 7)

Part 1 / Part 2 / Part 3 / Part 4 / Part 5 / Part 6

Today, we have the final four posts of what I consider to be the greatest disability blog posts of 2016. This time we have two by Ellen, one more by Mary Evelyn, and one more by Vilissa:

When a Stranger Thought I Was Disabled by Ellen at Ellen Stumbo

But while I sat on my daughter’s chair waiting in the hallway, a woman, who is not a regular staff member, turned to me and said, “Well aren’t you a pretty lady!”

I want you to get the scenario. Imagine a grownup talking to a little girl. Let’s say the little girl is two or three years old. Do you hear the tone of voice? Do you see the special smile? “Well aren’t you a pretty lady!” - Ellen Stumbo

The truth is, no matter how hard I try to convey what ableism feels like to me, there really is no adequate way for able-bodied people to truly understand.  This post is about as close as they can come.  I still remember the day I got a slew of indignant text messages from my friend, who had just experienced ableism...as an able-bodied woman.  I was, probably, less sympathetic than I could have been.  Instead, I was giddy, telling Ellen: "Yes!  That's what it feels like!"

If you've ever wondered at the damage ableism can do, but can't quite relate to disabled people when we share our stories, try reading this post (then read some of ours.)  Ellen does a great job conveying what ableism feels like.

[Image is: a close-up of a wheel on what could be a child's wheelchair.  The wheel is decorated with a design.  For more on wheelchairs, read the next post below, also by Ellen.]


When I Asked My Daughter, “What Do You Think I Feel About Your Disability?” by Ellen at Ellen Stumbo

“What do you think I feel about your wheelchair?”

“Hmmm,” she took a little while, “I don’t think you like it.”

“And why do you think that?”

“Well, I know you want me to walk.” She said. - Ellen Stumbo

An important, and frankly, really brave conversation between a mother and daughter.  Ellen took one of the very first conversations I had with her and used it as a jumping off point to talk with her daughter about her perception of Ellen's perception of her disability, and then, Ellen's actual perception of her daughter's disability. Such an important post.  Such an important conversation.

WHEN WE RECEIVE COMFORT FROM OUR CHILDREN by Mary Evelyn at What Do You Do Dear?

That’s when I heard my 4-year-old son’s voice, timid and confused. “What’s wrong, Mommy?”

I couldn’t even catch my breath enough to answer as my husband stepped in. “She’s alright, Simeon. Mommy’s just feeling sad for her friend right now.”

I thought the kid would be upset or maybe he’d go back to eating his breakfast, satisfied with the explanation. Instead he looked at me with concern and said softly, “I give you hug, Mommy?” Then, pointing to his shoulder, “You put your head right here?” - Mary Evelyn

I love this post because it shows that we, with disabilities can help others.  We can help our families.  We can comfort them.  Love them.  Be there for them.  It shows that parenting - and more than that - parenting a kid with a disability - is a two-way street.  Another post by Mary Evelyn grounded in respect and love.

White Privilege & Inspiration Porn by Vilissa at Ramp Your Voice!

I ardently despise inspiration porn, but as an advocate who focuses on the achievements and experiences of disabled Black girls and women (and other disabled girls and women of color), I do not have the “luxury” of picking and choosing stories that depict us in a positive, non-inspirational light.  Why is that?  Because our stories do not get the same or fair amount of spotlight and recognition as the ones that feature White disabled people. - Vilissa

An eye-opening post about how white privilege factors into inspiration porn.  Vilissa does a stellar job explaining this all the while sharing a story about a Black disabled little girl, who won a penmanship award earlier in 2016.

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Which of these posts resonated the most with you, and why?  Now that you have read all the Great Disability Blog Posts of 2016, do you have an overall favorite or favorites?  Did this list give you any new blogs to read in 2017?  Sound off in the comments and let me know.


2 comments:

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    ReplyDelete
    Replies
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